Pancaking Timelines in Adobe Premiere Pro

When two or more sequences are stacked one above the other in an Adobe Premiere Pro timeline, this is known as pancaking. In other words, they stack like flapjacks!

  Note: Pancake and Flapjack are used interchangeably in the southern U.S.

Note: Pancake and Flapjack are used interchangeably in the southern U.S.

Reasons for pancaking include:

  1. Better visual overview of project. 
  2. Improve time management.
  3. No need to toggle between sequences to copy and paste.
  4. Easier to puzzle out selects.

Here’s how you do it:

  1. Open into the Premiere Pro timeline the sequences you wish to stack, just like you normally do to edit.
  2. Grab the tab of the sequence you want to stack on top. Drag it down over the bottom (master/main) sequence just a little. When the top of the master sequence turns purple, let go. That’s it!

You can now review your selects and copy down the ones you want simply by dragging them!! 

If you’d like to dig into pancaking a bit further, visit Vashi Nedomansky’s blog! This is where I first learned about it. Not only does @vashikoo show you how he uses pancaking in several of his notable projects, he provides a project template or two! I enjoyed seeing the other ways in which Vashi organizes his Adobe Premiere Pro Projects.

 Vashi's Pancake Template.

Vashi's Pancake Template.